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Cradles of Chemistry

NIST building
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1901National Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgState: MDCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/nist.html

The federal government’s first physical science research laboratory was chartered by Congress on March 3, 1901, as the National Bureau of Standards, which became the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 1988. Recognizing the critical importance of chemical measures and standards, NIST established the Chemistry Division as one of its first programs.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Caption: NIST Advanced Measurement Laboratory (AML) building Gaitherburg, MD. The NIST Advanced Measurement Laboratory building was designed by HDR Architecture Inc., and built by Clark/Gilford, Joint Venture. Construction began on the building on June 9, 2000 and it was completed by June 2004.
Jamestown
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1600sHistoric Jamestown SettlementWilliamsburgState: VACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/jamestownchemistry.html, https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/jamestownchemistry/chemistry-at-jamestown-commemorative-booklet.pdf

Recent archaeological evidence reveals early Virginia, which included both the Roanoke and Jamestown colonies, as the birthplace of the American chemical enterprise. Chemical processes first applied experimentally at Roanoke were re-introduced at Jamestown twenty years later.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bootbearwdc (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Housing within James Fort at Jamestown settlement, Virginia
CAS
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1907Chemical Abstracts ServiceColumbusState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/cas.html

The Chemical Abstracts Service, a division of the American Chemical Society, has provided the most comprehensive repository of research in chemistry and related sciences for over 100 years. CAS innovations have fueled chemical research through development of the CAS RegistrySM and CAS databases which contain invaluable information for chemical scientists, including SciFinder® and STN®.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Credit: Courtesy CASImage Caption: Chemical Abstracts volume 100, 1984.
Williams-Miles History of Chemistry Collection
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1890-1899Brackett LibrarySearcyState: ARZip: 72143Country: USAWebsite: http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?__uuid=f42addef-aaae-4d38-a0d9-841ae6f3cc1d&_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_SUPERARTICLE&node_id=760&sec_url_var=region1&use_sec=false, https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/williams-milescollection/williams-miles-chemistry-collection-at-harding-university-commemorative-booklet.pdfCreator: Miles, Wyndham , National Institutes of Health

The Williams-Miles History of Chemistry Collection, established in 1992, is one of the leading historical collections of chemistry books in the southern United States. It represents a combined 70 years of scholarly collecting by Wyndham D. Miles, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and William D. Williams, Professor of Chemistry at Harding University. More than 2,000 volumes published between 1600 and 1900 are preserved here; the collection is particularly strong in 19th-century works.

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy ACSImage Caption: Williams-Miles History of Chemistry Collection at Harding University
Riverside Laboratory
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1921Riverside LaboratoryMcCookState: ILCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/uoplaboratory.htmlCreator: Dubbs, Carbon Petroleum (C. P.) , Halle, Hiram

This research and development complex was established by the founders of Universal Oil Products (later named UOP) to develop key products for the oil-refining industry. The processes created here profoundly affected the refining, treatment and conversion of crude oil and the development of the petroleum and petrochemical industries. Conceived as a combination of quiet academic retreat and industrial plant, Riverside attracted many of the world's leading petroleum scientists and a dedicated support team. Between 1921 and 1955, Riverside research resulted in 8,790 U.S. and foreign patents.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy ACSImage Caption: A laboratory at RiversideEra_date_from: 1921
Nucleic Acid and Protein Chemistry Research at Rockefeller University
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1901Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/rockefelleruniversity.htmlCreator: Rockefeller, John , Levene, Phoebus

For more than a century, scientists at Rockefeller University have enhanced our understanding of the molecular basis of life — specifically the relationship between the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. They showed that DNA transfers genetic information and that the sugars ribose and deoxyribose are the key building blocks of the nucleic acids RNA and DNA.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/S Shepherd (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Nucleic Acid and Protein Chemistry Research at Rockefeller UniversityEra_date_from: 1901
Herman Mark
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1946Polytechnic Institute of New York UniversityBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/polymerresearchinstitute.htmlCreator: Mark, Herman

The Polymer Research Institute was established in 1946 by Herman F. Mark, a pioneer in the study of giant molecules. The Institute brought together a number of polymer researchers to create the first academic facility in the United States devoted to the study and teaching of polymer science. Scientists associated with it later went on to establish polymer programs at other universities and institutions, contributing significantly to the development and growth of what has become a vital branch of chemistry, engineering, and materials science.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: Herman Mark and the Polymer Research InstituteEra_date_from: 1946
Havemeyer Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Columbia UniversityNew YorkState: NYZip: 10027Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/havemeyerhall.htmlCreator: Chandler, Charles Frederick , McKim, Charles Follen

Havemeyer Hall was built between 1896 and 1898 under the leadership of Charles Frederick Chandler. It provided research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in industrial, inorganic, organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Pioneering research done here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored, in 1932.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Havemeyer HallEra_date_from: 1898
Gilman Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Gilman HallBerkeleyState: CAZip: 94720Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/gilman.htmlCreator: Lewis, Gilbert , Howard, John Galen

Gilman Hall, built in 1916-1917, accommodated a growing College of Chemistry by providing expanded research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in physical, inorganic and nuclear chemistry. Work performed at Gilman Hall helped advance the fields of chemical thermodynamics and molecular structure, and has resulted in multiple Nobel Prizes. The Hall is most famous for the work of Glenn T. Seaborg and his coworkers, which included the successful identification and production the element Plutonium. Seaborg received the Nobel Prize in 1951 for his accomplishments.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Waqas Bhatti (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Gilman HallEra_date_from: 1917
Chandler Chemistry Laboratory
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1865Chandler-Ullmann HallBethlehemState: PAZip: 18015Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/chandlerlaboratory.html, https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/chandlerlaboratory/chandler-laboratory-at-lehigh-university-historical-resource.pdfCreator: Chandler, William Henry , Hutton, Addison

The William H. Chandler Chemistry Laboratory was conceived and planned by William Henry Chandler (1841-1906), professor, chairman, librarian, and acting president of Lehigh University. Designed by Philadelphia architect Addison Hutton and erected between 1884 and 1885 at a cost of $200,000, the building set the standard for laboratory construction for the next half century.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Chandler Chemistry LaboratoryEra_date_from: 1865
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