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Molecule

Discovery of Organic Free Radicals by Moses Gomberg
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900University Of MichiganAnn ArborState: MICountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/freeradicals.htmlCreator: Gomberg, Moses

In 1900, Moses Gomberg, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan, confirmed the existence of a stable, trivalent organic free radical: triphenylmethyl. In so doing, he challenged the then prevailing belief that carbon could have only four chemical bonds. Gomberg’s discovery made a major contribution to theoretical organic chemistry and fostered a field of research that continues to grow and expand. Today, organic free radicals are widely used in plastics and rubber manufacture, as well as medicine, agriculture and biochemistry.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Exp.)Image Caption: Discovery of Organic Free Radicals by Moses GombergEra_date_from: 1900
Herman Mark
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1946Polytechnic Institute of New York UniversityBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/polymerresearchinstitute.htmlCreator: Mark, Herman

The Polymer Research Institute was established in 1946 by Herman F. Mark, a pioneer in the study of giant molecules. The Institute brought together a number of polymer researchers to create the first academic facility in the United States devoted to the study and teaching of polymer science. Scientists associated with it later went on to establish polymer programs at other universities and institutions, contributing significantly to the development and growth of what has become a vital branch of chemistry, engineering, and materials science.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: Herman Mark and the Polymer Research InstituteEra_date_from: 1946
C.V. Raman and the Raman Effect
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1928Indian Association for the Cultivation of ScienceCalcutta, IndiaWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/ramaneffect.html, https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/ramaneffect/the-raman-effect-commemorative-booklet.pdfCreator: Raman, C.V.

"I propose this evening to speak to you on a new kind of radiation or light emission from atoms and molecules." With these prophetic words, Professor C. V. Raman of Calcutta University began his lecture to the South Indian Science Association in Bangalore on March 16, 1928. Raman proceeded to describe a discovery that resulted from a deceptively simple experiment. Conducted far from the great centers of scientific research in the Western world, the results would capture the attention of scientists around the world and bring many accolades, including the Nobel Prize, to their discoverer.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Pavlina2.0 (CC BY 3.0)vImage Caption: Raman Effect
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