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Watertown Arsenal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Civil Engineering ProfessionEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859Talcott AvenueWatertownState: MAZip: 02472Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Watertown-Arsenal/Creator: Parris, Alexander

The Watertown Arsenal was the first major engineering testing laboratory in America. It was created to store and manufacture cutting-edge military technology and weaponry. The United States Army Research and Materials Laboratory continued to use the site until 1989, employing soldiers and civilians to produce and test artillery.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: Watertown ArsenalEra_date_from: 1859
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1828Furnace Town Living Heritage MuseumSnow HillState: MDZip: 21863Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-159-nassawango-iron-furnace-%281828%29Creator: Maryland Iron Company
This furnace was the focal point of a pre-Industrial Revolution industry town, one of hundreds of furnaces that thrived and failed in the 19th century. The Maryland Iron Company (incorporated 1828) built this furnace along the Nassawango Creek roughly four miles northwest of the Pocomoke River to produce pig iron by the cold-blast process. In 1836-37 the furnace changed ownership several times, until Thomas Spence of Worcester County purchased it and began producing pig iron at a rate of 700 tons a year. Spence is credited with the installation of the hot-blast stove.
YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Nassawango Iron FurnaceEra_date_from: 1828
Joshua Hendy Iron Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906401 E Hendy AveSunnyvaleState: CAZip: 94086Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-34-joshua-hendy-iron-works-%281906%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4c99ebb6-8005-461a-a215-0af2f8eaf17c/34-Joshua-Hendy-Iron-Works.aspxCreator: Hendy, Joshua

This ironworks exemplified the adaptability required for industrial survival in a dynamic technical environment. It was a major western producer of mechanical equipment used in mining (especially large hydraulic machines), ship propulsion, irrigation, power generation, optical telescope mounts, and nuclear research.

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Joshua Hendy Iron WorksEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859202 Museum LaneTitusvilleState: PAZip: 16354Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-40-drake-oil-well-%281859%29Creator: Drake, Edwin
The drilling of this oil well marks the modern phase of the petroleum industry. A series of revolutionary technological changes, unforeseen even by the most prophetic, followed. Drake demonstrated practical oil recovery by applying salt-well drilling techniques, including the use of the derrick, and invented the modern method of driving iron pipe. While excavation for oil dates back to the 1500s in this area, its uses were not explored until the 1800s. It was first sold as a curative potion and then developed into a illuminant by the 1850s.
YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Zamoose (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Drake Oil WellEra_date_from: 1859
Craigellachie Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1814A941AberlourState: MorayZip: AB38Country: UKWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Craigellachie-Bridge/Creator: Telford, Thomas

This elegant cast iron arch bridge designed by Scotland's famous Thomas Telford was built from 1812 to 1814.  It is the earliest surviving example of a portable lattice-braced standard type that Telford developed for use at wide and deep water crossing sites unsuitable for masonry spans.  At least 10 of these bridge types were erected throughout Britain between 1814 and 1829.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Graham Robertson (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Craigellachie BridgeEra_date_from: 1814
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