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Elevator

Peavey-Haglin Concrete Grain Elevator
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 19005505 Minnesota 7 Service RdSt. Louis ParkState: MNZip: 55416Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/peavy-haglin-concrete-grain-elevator/Creator: Peavy, Frank , Haglin, Charles

No image dominates the Midwestern landscape like the monolithic grain elevator, whose present shape and construction owe much to grain company operator Frank Peavy and architect-builder Charles Haglin.

Wanting to improve on the flammability and cost of traditional wood-cribbed construction, Peavy speculated that reinforced concrete, in its infancy at the turn of the century, would outperform other materials. But critics feared that the elevator would collapse due to the vacuum created when grain was emptied from the air-tight structure.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Original Uploader was Elkman (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Peavey-Haglin Concrete Grain ElevatorEra_date_from: 1900
Radio City Music Hall Hydraulically Actuated Stage
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1932Radio City Music HallNew YorkState: NYZip: 10020Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/entertainment/-217-radio-city-music-hall-hydraulically-actuatedCreator: Clark, Peter

The precision "choreographed" staging of Radio City Music Hall offers size and versatility, unlike any other. Built in 1932 by Peter Clark, its innovative elevator system is a forerunner of other stage designs (including the Metropolitan Opera House) as well as aircraft carrier systems built in World War II. These elevators can handle people, animals, props and scenery at variable speeds, delivering them to the stage or above and also dropping out of sight in front to reappear again in the back, just as effectively.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Underneath the Orchestra Lift at the Radio City Music Hall
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