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1967

Middlesex Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 180371 Faulkner StreetBillericaState: MAZip: 01862Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Middlesex-Canal/Creator: Baldwin, Loammi , Weston, William

While the Erie Canal  has become well-known in the annals of American history, the Middlesex Canal, built two decades earlier and a model for canal engineers throughout young America, has only recently become recognized for its important achievements. Extending 27 miles northeast from Boston harbor to the Merrimack River near present-day Lowell, Masachusetts, the Middlesex Canal provided low-cost and efficient freight transport for almost five decades, helping to establish the canal in the U.S. as a viable means of economic development.  

YearAdded:
1967
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Daderot (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Middlesex CanalEra_date_from: 1803
Erie Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1825Hudson River to Lake ErieState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Erie-Canal/Creator: Wright, Benjamin, Geddes, James

In its day, the famous Erie Canal was the world's longest canal and America's greatest engineering feat. It was the principal route for emigrants from the East and agricultural products from the West. Before construction of the canal, New York City was the nation's fifth largest seaport, behind Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New Orleans. Within 15 years of its opening, New York was the busiest port in America, moving tonnages greater than Boston, Baltimore and New Orleans combined.  

YearAdded:
1967
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Erie Canal - Waterford, NYEra_date_from: 1825
Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1856Feather RiverOrovilleState: CAZip: 95966Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/Bidwell-Bar-Suspension-Bridge/Creator: Jones and Murray

Soon after gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill near Sacramento in 1848, General John Bidwell found gold near the Middle Fork of the Feather River. His discovery brought hordes of miners to the scene and Bidwell Bar was born. The Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge over the Feather River was one of several suspension bridges built in the region in the 1850s, and is the only one that remains.

 

YearAdded:
1967
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: The original Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge (1856), crossing over the Feather RiverEra_date_from: 1856
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