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1866

Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1866County KerryCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:County_Kerry_Transatlantic_Cable_Stations,_1866
The discoveries of electricity in the latter half of the 18th Century, and its close connection with magnetism, were the products of earlier experiments, which in turn led to the invention of the electric telegraph. Telegraphy had connected the interior of the United States, and it also connected Europe together. However, connecting the Americas and Europe proved to be a challenge. Due to the electric current that ran through the cable lines, insulation and waterproofing was necessary.
YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The County Kerry Cable StationsEra_date_from: 1866
John A. Roebling Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1866Ohio RiverCincinnatiState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/John-A--Roebling-Bridge/Creator: Roebling, John

In 1866, the Covington and Cincinnati Suspension Bridge was the largest suspension bridge in the world. Also called the Ohio Bridge, it was officially renamed the John A. Roebling Bridge in 1983. It was the first permanent bridge over the Ohio River and the only public project in America financed by private investors during the Civil War.

Renowned bridge designer John A. Roebling proposed the structure in 1846; but building the bridge would become a 20-year saga, with heated lobbying both for and against the crossing.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Tom Hamilton (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: John A. Roebling BridgeEra_date_from: 1866
Cornish - Windsor Covered Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1866Windsor Covered BridgeCornishState: VTZip: 03745Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/cornish-windsor-covered-bridge/Creator: Town, Ithiel

The Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge is the longest wooden bridge in the United States and the longest two-span, covered bridge in the world. It is also a classic example of wooden bridge-building in 19th-century America. With copious supplies of timber at hand and a generous reserve of carpentry skills available, bridge builders in early America quickly discarded the masonry arches prevalent in the Old World. Instead, they opted for a revival of timber-truss designs dating from 14th century Europe.

YearAdded:
1970
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/aussiegtl (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Cornish - Windsor Covered BridgeEra_date_from: 1866
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