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Steam Power

Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: SteamEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 19066605 13th Avenue SouthSeattleState: WAZip: 98108Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-45-georgetown-steam-plant-%281906%29-georgetown-powerCreator: Stone and Webster, Gilbreth, Frank
The Georgetown Steam Plant, a surprisingly complete and operable steam power plant after a career of nearly seventy-five years, was built in the early 1900s when Seattle's inexpensive hydroelectric power attracted manufacturers. Much of the power produced at this plant operated the streetcars.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/wneuetc (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Georgetown Steam PlantEra_date_from: 1906
Fairmount Water Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1815Schuylkill RiverPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/21-fairmount-water-worksCreator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

At a time when steam power was finding its first uses in America, Philadelphia opened two steam pumping stations, January 1801, to lift water from the Schuylkill River and distribute it through the city's wooden pipes and mains. By 1811 a new water power works was begun on the river near Morris Hill, and the Fairmount Water Works opened September 7, 1815. These water works represented the first large-scale application of steam pumping to water service in the country.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA View looking northeast at waterworks from across Schuylkill River. Photo taken December, 1984.
Era_date_from: 1815
Duquesne Incline
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1877Mt. WashingtonPittsburghState: PAZip: 15211Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---1/-27-duquesne-incline-%281877%29Creator: Diescher, Samuel

Designed by Sam Diescher, son-in-law of the Monongahela's designer John Endres, the Duquesne Incline opened May 20, 1877, as the second of seventeen built and operated in the Pittsburgh area. It has operated with only minor interruptions for the last one hundred years. A preservation group from Duquesne Heights and Mount Washington interceded in 1962 to refurbish this incline to working order. Like the Monongahela, the Duquesne was steam powered and then converted to electric and updated with modern safety devices.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Flickr/Nogwater (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Duquesne InclineEra_date_from: 1877
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