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Lindbergh

The instrument panel of the Spirit of St. Louis
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1920sDateCreated: 1920-19272701 Midway DrSan DiegoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/01-0304%20Dutch%20Flats%20bro.pdfCreator: Ryan, Claude, Lindbergh, Charles

On this site, which was the Dutch Flats Airport, Charles A. Lindbergh made the first flight of his Spirit of St. Louis airplane, constructed in 60 days by dedicated employees of Ryan Airlines, Inc.  The 20-minute flight on 28 April 1927 was witnessed by those who built the aircraft. Lindbergh describes the flight:

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: The instrument panel of the Spirit of St. Louis
Brooks AFB, Old Hangar 9
Society: ASCEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1918Brooks City-BaseSan AntonioState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Brooks-AFB,-Old-Hangar-9/Creator: World War I Army Air Service, Kahn, Albert

In its infancy, Hangar Nine housed Curtiss JN-4s ("Jennys") like the one Charles Lindbergh landed there when he reported for duty as a flying cadet in 1924.

As the U.S. was preparing to enter World War I, the Army raced to build an entire airfield, complete with 16 wooden hangars, successfully completing it in less than a year. The last remaining World War I facility of its kind, Hangar Nine at Brooks Air Force Base represents the emergence of fast-track construction methods using available materials and the skills of a local workforce.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain (U.S. Air Force)Image Caption: Brooks AFB, Old Hangar 9Era_date_from: 1918
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