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Cooper-Bessemer Type GMV Integral-Angle Gas Compressor
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1944Knox County Historical MuseumMount VernonState: OHZip: 43050Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-240-cooper-bessemer-type-gmv-integral-angle-gas-e, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/9e28281d-2403-4337-9ec3-df2251a26ede/240-Cooper-Bessemer-Type-GMV-Integral-Angle-Gas-E.aspxCreator: Boyer, Ralph , Cooper-Bessemer Corporation

This compressor was a product of the combined technology and design heritage of both the C. & G. Cooper Company of Mount Vernon and the Bessemer Gas Engine Company of Pennsylvania, which had merged in 1929. Ralph L. Boyer, the chief architect of the GMV, worked for Cooper-Bessemer from 1926 through 1965.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: courtesy www.osagcd.comImage Caption: Cooper-Bessemer Type GMV Integral-Angle Gas EEra_date_from: 1944
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: People and OrganizationsEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1757-1775Franklin House MuseumLondonState: EnglandZip: WC2N 5NFCountry: UKWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Benjamin_Franklin%27s_work_in_London,_1757-1775Creator: Franklin, Benjamin
"Benjamin Franklin, American electrician, printer, and diplomat, spent many years on Craven Street. He lived at No. 7 between 1772 and 1775 and at No. 36 from 1757-1762 and again from 1764-1772. During these years, Franklin popularized the study of electricity, performed experiments, and served as an adviser on lightning conductors." (The plaque may be viewed at the Franklin house museum at 36 Craven St, London, England.) Franklin, considered one of the founders of modern Physics, was already a famous scientist when he arrived at Craven Street in 1757.
YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Elliott Brown (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Benjamin Franklin House on Craven Street in London, where Franklin lived for 16 years, and where he did much of his most famous work. Converted into a museum.Era_date_from: 1757
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