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1908

Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: NuclearEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1908Hudson RiverNew York City to Hoboken State: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/hudson-and-manhattan-rr-tunnel/Creator: Haskin, DeWitt Clinton, McAdoo, William G.

A transportation tunnel under the Hudson River connecting Manhattan and New Jersey was first considered in the 1860s, fueled by New York City's rapidly growing congestion and the inadequacy of existing ferry service to population centers across the river. DeWitt Clinton Haskin, an engineer formerly with the Union Pacific Railroad, started the project in 1874 and subsequently endured an extended lawsuit, several failures of the tunnel wall, and an exhaustion of funds before quitting in 1887 with only 1,600 feet completed. 

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Courtesy ascemetsection.orgImage Caption: The Hudson and Manhattan tunnel was the first large transportation tunnel constructed under a major river in the United States..Era_date_from: 1908
Northern Pacific High Line Bridge No 64
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1908Sheyenne RiverValley CityState: NDZip: 58072Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/northern-pacific-high-line-bridge-no--64/

The Northern Pacific High Line Bridge No. 64, built between 1907 and 1908, has continued to perform yeoman service in the uninterrupted flow of the Nation's commerce. Nearly, 100 years after this bridge officially opened, it still carries 125-ton car unit coal trains, double stack container trains, lumber, and refined products at train speeds of 50 m.p.h.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Original Photo: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Northern Pacific High Line Bridge No 64Era_date_from: 1908
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1908Alden Research LaboratoryHoldenState: MAZip: 01520Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-75-alden-research-laboratory-rotating-boom-%281908%29Creator: Allen, Charles M.
The idea of constructing a rotating boom for hydromechanical tests at the Alden Hydraulic Laboratory originated with Professor Charles Metcalf Allen, head of the lab from 1896 to 1950. The original boom was designed in 1908 by Professor Allen, assisted by two Worcester Polytechnic Institute students. Professor Allen needed a moving test stand for hydraulic experiments and for rating current meters.
YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: L.J. Hooper (left), Charles M. Allen (center) and Clyde W. Hubbard (right) sit together on the rotating boom.Era_date_from: 1908
North Island Main Trunk Railway
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1908Pipitea Point StationWellingtonZip: 6011Country: New ZealandWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/North-Island-Main-Trunk-Railway/Creator: Rochfort, John

The North Island Main Trunk Railway permitted overland travel and development of the New Zealand hinterland. Built under challenging conditions and over difficult terrain, all cuts, fills, and tunneling were minimized by careful use of the topography and by innovative engineering. 

Over 30 miles south of Taumarunui, the North Island Main Trunk Railway climbs 2,086 feet to the edge of the great Waimarino Plateau. But over the last seven miles, an abrupt increase in altitude of over 700 feet posed an engineering challenge that led to the design of the famed Raurimu Spiral. 

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/SibleyHunter (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Wellington Railway Station, part of the original North Island Main Trunk RailwayEra_date_from: 1908
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