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2008

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Environmental ControlEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1885507 East Michigan StreetMilwaukeeState: MIZip: 53202Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/244-multi-zone-automatic-temperature-controlCreator: Johnson, Warren

he Automatic Temperature Control System was named as a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark in 2008. Warren S. Johnson came up with the idea for automatic temperature control while teaching at Normal School in Whitewater, Wisconsin in the 1880's. Originally, janitors would have to enter each classroom to determine if it was too hot or cold and then adjust the dampers in the basement accordingly. Johnson sought a way to end, or at least minimize the classroom interruptions of the janitors and increase the comfort level of the students.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Caption: Multi-Zone Automatic Temperature Control SystemEra_date_from: 1885
John Penn & Sons Oscillating Steam Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1841Aboard the paddle steamer DiesbarDresdenState: SaxonyZip: 01069Country: GermanyWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-245-john-penn---sons-oscillating-steam-engine-%2818Creator: John Penn & Sons

The oscillating steam engine, built by John Penn & Sons, is located aboard the famed paddle steamer Diesbar.  Diesbar is the second oldest of a fleet of nine paddle steamers in Dresden.  What makes the Diesbar unique is its coal fueled engine and single deck design.  The John Penn and Sons engine that runs the steamer is the oldest operational marine steam engine in the world.  It has been in operation for over 165 years. 

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Photo: Sächsische DampfschiffahrtImage Caption: John Penn & Sons Oscillating Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1841
Goldfields Water Supply
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903LOT 2714 Goldfields HwyKalgoorlieState: W AustZip: 6430Country: AustraliaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Goldfields-Water-Supply/Creator: Hodgson, Thomas C. , O'Connor, Charles Yelverton

Originally known as the Coolgardie Goldfields Water Supply Scheme, the Goldfields Water Supply, Western Australia, has exceptional and unique cultural significance for Australia.  Western Australia's first Premier, the dynamic and visionary Sir John Forrest, recognized the need for this extraordinary project to support the young and burgeoning gold mining industry in the dry interior of the state.  In 1896 he directed C Y O'Connor, the colony's first Engineer-in-Chief, to find a permanent solution to the water supply problem in the area, which lacked any permanent surface water supplies and

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Fernando de Sousa (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Goldfields Water SupplyEra_date_from: 1903
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1990-1999DateCreated: 1996DLP(r) Demo CenterPlanoState: TXZip: 75023Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/--243-digital-micromirror-device-%281996%29Creator: Hornbeck, Larry , Texas Instruments
The Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) was recognized as an ASME Mechanical Engineering Historic Landmark in 2008. Its development began in 1977 with the forming of a small team at Texas Instruments headed by noted physicist Larry Hornbeck. Texas Instruments was given a project from the Department of Defense to create a device that could modulate light.
YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Adpowers (CC BY-SA 1.0)Image Caption: Picture of DLP chip used in a digital projector at the Cinerama in SeattleEra_date_from: 1996
Choate Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1764 RiverIpswichState: MAZip: 01938Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Choate-Bridge/Creator: Choate, John

The Choate Bridge of Essex County, completed in 1764, is the oldest documented two-span masonry arch bridge in the United States. Named after Colonel John Choate, who supervised the construction, the bridge is located on South Main Street and spans the Ipswich River. Originally, the bridge measured 80 feet 6 inches long and 20 feet 6 inches wide. In 1838 it was widened to 35 feet 6 inches on the east side in order to accommodate another lane of traffic. The west side and the parapet of the bridge, along with the inscription to Colonel Choate, remained unchanged.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Choate BridgeEra_date_from: 1764
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