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Air and Space Transportation

Voyager Spacecraft Interplanetary Explorers
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1972Pioneer RdFlintridgeState: CAZip: 91011Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-171-voyager-spacecraft-interplanetary-explorers-%28Creator: NASA

The Voyager explorers, which provided scientists and the world with the first detailed pictures of faraway planets, were designed and tested during 1972 to 1977. The two most intelligent machines ever built in the NASA space program, the explorers were launched from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in 1977. Voyager 2 was launched first on August 20, followed by Voyager 1 on September 5.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Voyager Spacecraft Interplanetary ExplorersEra_date_from: 1972
Montgomery Glider Replica
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883601 SkywaySan CarlosState: CAZip: 94070Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-189-montgomery-glider-%281883%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/ee5a9313-188d-40ad-83fd-12909179fafd/189-Montgomery-Glider.aspxCreator: Montgomery, John

The glider was the first heavier-than-air human-carrying aircraft to achieve controlled piloted flight. On his first successful flight, August 28, 1883, John Montgomery soared at about 600 feet. The Montgomery glider's success demonstrated aerodynamic principles and designs fundamental to the modern aircraft.

YearAdded:
1996
Image Caption: Montgomery Glider replica, International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark, 1996, original glider by John Joseph Montgomery, 1883 - Hiller Aviation Museum - San Carlos, CaliforniaEra_date_from: 1883
Howard Hughes Flying Boat, HK-1
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1947Evergreen Aviation & Space MuseumMcMinnvilleState: ORZip: 97128Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-219-howard-hughes-flying-boat,-hk-1-%281947%29Creator: Kaiser, Henry

Better known as the "Spruce Goose," the Howard Hughes Flying Boat was designed and built by Hughes Aircraft Co., to be the largest wood-constructed and the largest wingspan airplane ever built. As Hughes perfected his craft, he added significantly to what is known in areas of large-lift capability and power-boost systems. Originally designated the HK-1 in 1942, it was designed to meet wartime troop and material transportation needs (flying just high enough to evade submarine attacks).

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Public Domain (Federal Aviation Administration)Image Caption: Howard Hughes Flying Boat, HK-1Era_date_from: 1947
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Marshall Space Flight CenterHuntsvilleState: ALZip: 35808Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-170-advanced-engine-test-facility-at-marshall-%2819Creator: von Braun, Wernher
The Advanced Engine Test Facility was built in 1964, three years after President John F. Kennedy committed the United States to world leadership in aeronautical science. Conceived and designed by Wernher von Braun, the first director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, this facility was used to perform static tests on the booster of the Saturn V rocket, which launched Apollo 11 to the moon on July 16, 1969. The stand has four concrete legs, each four feet thick and rising 144 feet to a steel superstructure supporting a 200-ton crane.
YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Saturn V Rocket being lifted onto the A-2 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space CenterEra_date_from: 1964
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1957Gillespie Fields AirportEl CajonState: CAZip: 92020Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-102-atlas-launch-vehicle-%281957%29Creator: Convair Division of General Dynamics, U.S. Air Force
The Atlas E-2 Space Booster, or launch vehicle, is a modified intercontinental ballistic missile developed by the Convair Division of General Dynamics and the U.S. Air Force. The basic concept of the Atlas system was proven in its first flight on June 11, 1957, followed over the years by the launching more than five hundred vehicles including the Pioneer, Ranger, Mariner, and Surveyor. Many payloads were sent into orbit as detachable sections of Atlas missiles.
YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: All 3 images are Public DomainImage Caption: A compilation of three successful launches vehicles in action. On the left is the Atlas-Centaur, the center is the Atlas-Agena, and the right is the SM-65A Atlas missile.Era_date_from: 1957
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1968Saturn V Center

6225 Vectorspace Blvd
TitusvilleState: FLZip: 32780Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-162-apollo-space-command-module-%281968%29, http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/apollo14info.htmlCreator: North American Aviation
The Apollo was the vehicle that first transported humans to the moon and safely back to earth. Nine lunar flights were made between 1968 and 1972. The command module, built by North American Aviation (at the time of launch, North American Rockwell Corporation), accommodated three astronauts during the mission. It was the only portion of the Apollo spacecraft system designed to withstand the intense heat of atmospheric re-entry at 25,000 mph and complete the mission intact. This command module at Rockwell flew as Apollo 14 in 1971.
YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Chad Nordstrom (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: The real Apollo Space Command Module on display at the Kennedy Space Center's Saturn V Building.Era_date_from: 1968
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1972Cradle of Aviation MuseumEast Garden CityState: NYZip: 11530Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-218-apollo-lunar-module-lm-13-%281972%29Creator: Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp
The Apollo lunar module (LM-13) was developed by the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp. (now Northrop Grumman). The LM's main functions were to carry two astronauts from lunar orbit to the moon's surface, and then return them to lunar orbit to rendezvous and dock with the Apollo command-service modules. On the surface, the LM served as a shelter and base of operations as the astronauts carried out their exploration and experiments. On July 20, 1969, the LM "Eagle" touched down on the moon, becoming the first piloted spacecraft to land on a celestial body other than Earth.
YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Michael Gray (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: The Apollo Lunar Module LM-13 on display in the Cradle of Aviation Museum Era_date_from: 1972
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1942Air ZooKalamazooState: MIZip: 49002Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-238-grumman-wildcat--sto-wing-wing-folding-mecha, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/2d64abc8-3fa3-4d29-92d4-40db4777e8b2/238-Grumman-Wildcat-Sto-Wing-Wing-folding-Mechanism.aspxCreator: Grumman, Leroy

The Wildcat's innovative "Sto-Wing" mechanism developed on the XF4F-4 prototype by Leroy (Roy) Grumman (1895-1982), a founder of Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, was crucial to the U. S. Navy's success during World War II.

The idea of a folding wing was not new: as early as 1920, F.M. Osborne patented a high-wing monoplane with folding wings, but never produced this design. A 1928 plane with folding wings designed by W. Leonard Bonney crashed on its first flight.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Navy)Image Caption: Grumman Wildcat “Sto-Wing” Wing-folding MechaEra_date_from: 1942
First practical US helicopter, pioneering the single-main-rotor concept
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1939Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48214Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-95-sikorsky-vs-300-helicopter-%281939%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/b997b811-c5c4-44e3-87d3-239bda559734/95-Sikorsky-VS-300-Helicopter.aspxCreator: Sikorsky, Igor I.

America's first practical helicopter, it pioneered the single main rotor concept that became the predominant helicopter configuration throughout the world. The principles that were developed and demonstrated by the VS-300 had direct application in the design of the early mass-production helicopter, marking the beginning of the world's rotorcraft industry.

The initial flight of the VS-300 was piloted by its designer, Igor I. Sikorsky (1889-1972), on September 14, 1939, in Stratford, Connecticut.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Sikorsky VS-300 HelicopterEra_date_from: 1939
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