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1800-1829

Portland Observatory
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1807Munjoy HillPortlandState: MEZip: 04101Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Portland-Observatory/Creator: Moody, Lemuel

The Portland Observatory was built in 1807 by Captain Lemuel Moody to serve as a communication station for Portland Harbor. Portland Observatory was one of the earliest marine signal stations in the United States, and it is the last known to survive. The Observatory's location on Munjoy Hill gave it a clear view of vessels approaching Portland Harbor. The Observatory contributed to the prosperity of Portland Harbor as a vital center of maritime commerce during the "Golden Age of Sail."  

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Econrad (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Portland ObservatoryEra_date_from: 1807
Philadelphia Municipal Water Supply
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 18012600 Benjamin Franklin PkwyPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Philadelphia-Municipal-Water-Supply/Creator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

After an initial difficulty in attracting customers (who were used to getting their water from public pumps and private wells and cisterns), Philadelphia's waterworks soon couldn't keep up with demand. John Davis and Frederick Graff designed a complete remodeling of the system in 1811 so that it could supply the city's growing needs. 

YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Philadelphia Municipal Water SupplyEra_date_from: 1801
National Road
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1811-1839WheelingState: WVCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/National-Road/Creator: Knight, Jonathan , Thompson, Josiah

The National Road was the first interstate highway in the United States, and the first roadway to be financed with federal money. Authorized by Congress during the administration of Thomas Jefferson in 1806, the road was built over time and in sections from Cumberland, Maryland, westward through the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia (now West Virginia), Ohio, and Indiana, before terminating at the state capital of Vidalia, Illinois.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Citynoise (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: National RoadEra_date_from: 1811
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1828Furnace Town Living Heritage MuseumSnow HillState: MDZip: 21863Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-159-nassawango-iron-furnace-%281828%29Creator: Maryland Iron Company
This furnace was the focal point of a pre-Industrial Revolution industry town, one of hundreds of furnaces that thrived and failed in the 19th century. The Maryland Iron Company (incorporated 1828) built this furnace along the Nassawango Creek roughly four miles northwest of the Pocomoke River to produce pig iron by the cold-blast process. In 1836-37 the furnace changed ownership several times, until Thomas Spence of Worcester County purchased it and began producing pig iron at a rate of 700 tons a year. Spence is credited with the installation of the hot-blast stove.
YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Nassawango Iron FurnaceEra_date_from: 1828
United States Military Academy
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Civil Engineering ProfessionEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1813On the Hudson RiverWest PointState: NYZip: 10996Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/united-states-military-academy-at-west-point/Creator: Jefferson, Thomas , Thayer, Sylvanus

In 1794, Congress authorized and President Thomas Jefferson signed into law the raising of a Corps of Artillerists and Engineers (now the United States Army Corps of Engineers) to be educated and stationed at the newly created United States Military Academy. The U.S. Military Academy was the first school of engineering in America to offer formal instruction in civil engineering. 

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (US Army)Image Caption: United States Military AcademyEra_date_from: 1813
Middlesex Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 180371 Faulkner StreetBillericaState: MAZip: 01862Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Middlesex-Canal/Creator: Baldwin, Loammi , Weston, William

While the Erie Canal  has become well-known in the annals of American history, the Middlesex Canal, built two decades earlier and a model for canal engineers throughout young America, has only recently become recognized for its important achievements. Extending 27 miles northeast from Boston harbor to the Merrimack River near present-day Lowell, Masachusetts, the Middlesex Canal provided low-cost and efficient freight transport for almost five decades, helping to establish the canal in the U.S. as a viable means of economic development.  

YearAdded:
1967
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Daderot (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Middlesex CanalEra_date_from: 1803
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1807New River Trail State ParkAustinvilleState: VAZip: 24312Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-63-jackson-ferry-shot-tower-%281807%29Creator: Jackson, Thomas , Watts, William
This facility was typical of others in the country that made small spherical lead shot for the fowling pieces of frontier settlers. Smelted lead from the nearby Austinville mines was melted at the top of the tower and poured through a sizing sieve to produce small droplets. Surface tension caused the molted lead to assume a spherical shape that solidified during its 150-foot fall. The shot was then collected in a water-filled kettle at the bottom of the shaft. The "drop process" was patented in England in 1769 by William Watts, a craftsman of Bristol, England.
YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Dr00bie (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Jackson Ferry Shot TowerEra_date_from: 1807
Cranetown Triangulation Site
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Boundaries & SurveysEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1817Kip's Castle ParkEssex CountyState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Cranetown-Triangulation-Site/Creator: Hassler, Ferdinand

The precise system of measurements provided today by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey originated with an act of Congress under the administration of Thomas Jefferson in 1807 that funded work on "an accurate chart" of America's coastal waters. Intended to aid sea-going commerce, the first work on this project, carried out in 1816 and 1817, helped establish a complex grid of geodetic reference points on which much of our land- and sea-based navigation now depends. 

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Source: http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/theodolites/hasslers_first_sketch.html (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)Image Caption: Cranetown Triangulation SiteEra_date_from: 1817
Gota Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1810 to 1832Götakanal
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GothenburgState: Västra Götaland CountyCountry: SwedenWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Gota-Canal/Creator: von Platen, Baltzer, Telford, Thomas

The Gota Canal is the biggest infrastructure project ever built in Sweden. The canal was dug by hand with shovels made of wood. It took over 22 years of 12-hour days - an estimated 12 million man-days of labor - to complete the project.  

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Patrick Strandberg (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Gota CanalEra_date_from: 1810 to 1832
Fairmount Water Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1815Schuylkill RiverPhiladelphiaState: PAZip: 19130Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/21-fairmount-water-worksCreator: Graff, Frederick , Latrobe, Benjamin

At a time when steam power was finding its first uses in America, Philadelphia opened two steam pumping stations, January 1801, to lift water from the Schuylkill River and distribute it through the city's wooden pipes and mains. By 1811 a new water power works was begun on the river near Morris Hill, and the Fairmount Water Works opened September 7, 1815. These water works represented the first large-scale application of steam pumping to water service in the country.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA View looking northeast at waterworks from across Schuylkill River. Photo taken December, 1984.
Era_date_from: 1815
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