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1830-1839

Borden Base Line
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Boundaries & SurveysEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1831South DeerfieldState: MACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Borden-Base-Line/Creator: Paine, Robert Treat , Borden, Simeon

The Borden Base Line is a 39,009.73 feet (7.42 miles ) survey line through the State of Massachusetts. The line was the first project of its kind undertaken in America and its establishment was the key element for Massachusetts pioneering mandate to survey the entire state. 

The challenge was to use trigonometrical principles, instead of astronomical observation alone, to provide greater accuracy in surveying large areas.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Exp.)Image Caption: An 1871 map of Massachusetts highlighting the Borden Base LineEra_date_from: 1831
Thomas Viaduct Railroad Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1835Patapsco RiverArbutusState: MDZip: 21227Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Thomas-Viaduct-Railroad-Bridge/Creator: Latrobe II, Benjamin Henry, McCartney, John

Opened in 1835, the Thomas Viaduct was the first multiple-arch, stone railroad viaduct in the United States. The viaduct is composed of eight arches each with a clear span of about 58 feet. The viaduct has an overall length of 614 feet and a height of about 60 feet above the Patapsco River. Construction of the viaduct began in August of 1833, and a ceremony marking its completion was conducted on July 4, 1835. The viaduct was constructed for the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad and is named in honor Philip E. Thomas, who served from 1827 to 1836 as the first president of the B&O.

YearAdded:
1964
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Thomas Viaduct Railroad BridgeEra_date_from: 1835
St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 18352817 Canal Street
New OrleansState: LACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-101-st--charles-avenue-streetcar-line-%281835%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/40ef6e7c-697d-4f77-8daa-059a37f698b3/101-St-Charles-Avenue-Streetcar-Line-1835.aspxCreator: Perley A. Thomas Car Company

The St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line is the oldest surviving interurban-urban passenger rail transportation system in the United States. Originally incorporated as the New Orleans Carrollton Rail Road in 1833, service began in 1835. A variety of motive power had been used including horses, mules, overhead cable, steam engines, and ammonia engines before electrification in 1893. The 900-series cars presently in service were designed and built by the Perley A. Thomas Car Company of High Point, North Carolina, in 1923 to 1924.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Wikipedia/Falkue (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: St. Charles Avenue Streetcar LineEra_date_from: 1835
Houston Ship Channel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1837BaytownHoustonState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asce.org/project/houston-ship-channel/

The 50-mile Houston Ship Channel is a manmade port for ocean-going vessels, stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to Houston and Harris County, Texas.   

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Roy Luck (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Houston Ship ChannelEra_date_from: 1837
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1834Rennshaw StreetPortsmouthState: VAZip: 23704Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/People-and-Projects/Projects/Landmarks/Naval-Drydocks-at-Boston-and-Norfolk/Creator: Baldwin, Loammi
Baldwin's dry dock in Virginia has been designated a National Historical Landmark and is still in use at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. The Charlestown dry dock and original pump house, while no longer used, are on display as part of the Boston National Historical Park. Although the need for dry-docking facilities to speed the cleaning and repair of ships in America's naval fleet was apparent as early as 1789, it was the War of 1812, and the burning of Washington, D.C., that finally convinced Congress of the importance of a coastal defense system based on a strong navy.
YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Gosport Naval Dry DocksEra_date_from: 1834
Canton Viaduct
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1835CantonState: MACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Canton-Viaduct/Creator: McNeill, William Gibbs , Whistler, George Washington

For more than 174 years, the Canton Viaduct has stood as a dominating structure on the New England landscape. When completed in 1835, the slightly curved, granite masonry bridge - 615 feet long, 70 feet high, and 22 feet wide - carried a single track of the Boston and Providence Railroad, providing a critical link in the establishment of rail service between Boston and New York. In 1860, a second track was added. With few major alterations, the viaduct has continued to provide safe rail transportation to heavier and faster loads throughout the 20th century.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Canton ViaductEra_date_from: 1835
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Fields, Waves & ElectromagneticsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1836National University of MaynoothState: County KildareCountry: IrelandWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Callan%27s_Pioneering_Contributions_to_Electrical_Science_and_Technology,_1836Creator: Callan, Nicholas
A pioneer in the development of electrical science, Nicholas Joseph Callan was born on 22 December 1799 in Darver, Ireland. He started the priesthood at Navan Seminary, and continued his studies at St. Patrick’s College Maynooth, where he studied natural and experimental philosophy under Dr. Cornelius Denvir. After his ordination as priest in 1823, Callan pursued his doctorate in divinity in Rome, where he became acquainted with Galvani and Volta’s work in the study of electricity, and recognized the potential to put it to practical and commercial use with powerful batteries.
YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Callan's Pioneering Contributions to Electrical Science and TechnologyEra_date_from: 1836
Ascutney Mill Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1834Mill BrookWindsorState: VTZip: 05089Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Ascutney-Mill-Dam/Creator: Beard, Ithamar , Cobb, Simeon

Ithamar A. Beard, an engineer of some prominence in New England, surveyed the mill brook and selected the best site for a storage dam. Contractor Simeon Cobb, knowledgeable of contemporary civil engineering practices, made major changes to the dam's original design, converting the linear dam into a gentle arch.

YearAdded:
1970
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ymblanter (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: The Ascutney Mill Arch-Gravity DamEra_date_from: 1834
Charleston - Hamburg Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1833CharlestonState: SCCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asce.org/project/charleston-hamburg-railroad/Creator: Allen, Horatio

Built with a single set of tracks consisting of hardwood rails and wooden ties, and using wooden trestles to carry it over low-lying areas, the 136-mile Charleston-Hamburg Railroad was one of the longest railroads in the world when it was completed in 1833. It also became the first railroad in the United States to be powered entirely by steam, the first to carry mail under contract, and the first to provide regularly scheduled passenger service.

YearAdded:
1969
Image Credit: The earliest general map to show the South Carolina Canal and Rail Road Company's line which began in Charleston, S.C. It was completed to Hamburg, S.C., in 1833. Its 136 miles of track were then the longest in the world. Image Caption: Charleston - Hamburg Railroad, also known as Era_date_from: 1833
Allegheny Portage Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1834Hollidays burg to JohnstownDuncansvilleState: PAZip: 16635Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/allegheny-portage-railroad/Creator: Private Contractors

In an era when roads and canals were the most common means of overland transportation, the Allegheny Portage Railroad provided a novel alternative. The railway carried fully-loaded canal boats over the steep grades of the Allegheny Mountain. The 36-mile system rose almost 2,300 feet above sea level at its summit - the highest level to which canal boats had ever been carried. The project included ten double-tracked inclined planes, powered by steam engines. Its 900-foot Staple Bend Tunnel, cut from solid rock, was the first railroad tunnel constructed in America.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: The Staple Bend Tunnel, completed 1834 for the Allegheny Portage RailroadEra_date_from: 1834
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