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River des Peres Sewage & Drainage Works
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1920-1929 DateCreated: 1924-1921 St. Louis State: MO Zip: 63109 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/River-des-Peres-Sewage---Drainage-Works/ Creator: Horner, W.W.

In 1915, a tropical storm dropped nearly 11 inches of rain on St. Louis in just 17 hours, causing a devastating flood. Claiming 11 lives and the homes of 1,025 families, the flood focused public and government attention onto the problems of the river. 

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Millbrooky Image Caption: Today, the River Des Peres Sewage & Drainage Works provides the backbone for the 110-square-mile St. Louis drainage basin. Era_date_from: 1924
Missouri River Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1920-1929 DateCreated: 1920-1927 Chamberlain State: SD Zip: 57325 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Missouri-River-Bridges/ Creator: Kirkham, John Edward

The Chamberlain is the only surviving bridge of the original five. The others were replaced as the river rose due to flood control dams put in place over time.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Image Caption: Members of the South Dakota Army National Guard’s 200th Engineer Company guide a raft on the Missouri River during a river crossing operation on June 11, 2016. The Chamberlain in the background is the only surviving bridge of the five. The others were replaced as the river expanded due to flood control dams. Era_date_from: 1920
Lacey V. Murrow Bridge and Mount Baker Ridge Tunnels
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1940-1949 DateCreated: 1940 King County State: WA Zip: 98040 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Lacey-V--Murrow-Bridge-and-Mount-Baker-Ridge-Tunnels/ Creator: Murrow, Lacey V., Hadley, Homer

The 1.5 mile Lacey V. Murrow Bridge was the largest floating structure in the world and the first to be built of reinforced concrete when completed in 1940.  The bridge consisted of typically 300-foot long pontoons floated to site and rigidly connected to form a continuous structure and incorporated a unique floating concrete draw-span to allow for passage of marine traffic.  The original floating structure, constructed by Pontoon Bridge Builders, was accidentally sunk in 1990 during a major renovation effort and was replaced by 1993.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Walter Siegmund Image Caption: The bridge and tunnel project were key in improving eastern access to Seattle, a major commercial port on the eastern rim of the Pacific Ocean. Era_date_from: 1940
Kansas City Park and Boulevard System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1915 Kansas City State: MI Zip: 64106 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Kansas-City-Park-and-Boulevard-System/ Creator: Kessler, George

"Who in Europe, or in America for that matter, knows that Kansas City is one of the loveliest cities on earth? [...] the residential section is a masterpiece of city planning [...]; Few cities have been built with so much regard for beauty."  

YearAdded:
1974
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Charvex Image Caption: The park system encouraged planned land use, raised real estate values, and provided incentives for quality residential developments. Era_date_from: 1915
Texas Commerce Bank Building
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1920-1929 DateCreated: 1929 JP Morgan Chase Building Houston State: TX Zip: 77002 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/texas-commerce-bank-building/ Creator: Simpson, William E.

The tower was designed to rest on a continuous reinforced concrete mat, 4 feet thick, with the base of the slab 24 feet below street level.

What makes the Texas Commerce Bank Building revolutionary in the civil engineering world is not so much the building itself, but its foundation.  Initial studies for the type of foundation to be used began in the fall of 1927.  William E. Simpson, the building's chief structural engineer, suggested using a mat foundation, something new for Houston's multistory buildings.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Reagan Rothenberger Image Caption: The Texas Commerce Bank Building, now called the JP Morgan Chase Building, had a reinforced concrete mat foundation that was revolutionary at the time. Era_date_from: 1929
Stevens Pass Railroad Tunnels & Switchback System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1900 Stevens Pass State: WA Zip: 98826 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/stevens-pass-railroad-tunnels/ Creator: Stevens, John F.

In the years following the Civil War, the land west of the Mississippi River was being settled and the Pacific Northwest explored. There remained, however, a large portion of Montana, Idaho, and Washington that contained enormous quantities of timber and minerals, but was not accessible by rail. By far the most grueling stretch was the Stevens Pass area in the Cascade Mountains.

YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Seattleretro Image Caption: Railroad development in Stevens Pass made accessible a timber and mineral rich region of Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Era_date_from: 1900
San Antonio River Walk & Flood Control System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Supply & Control Era: 1930-1949 DateCreated: 1929-1941 San Antonio State: TX Zip: 78205 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/San-Antonio-River-Walk---Flood-Control-System/ Creator: Hugman, Robert H.H., Arneson, Edward P.

San Antonio's River Walk, a catalyst for abundant commercial and tourism enterprise, is generally regarded by cities and urban planners throughout the world as a prototype for the development of urban riverfront sites. The River Walk's success, however, would not have been possible without a series of flood-control and architecture projects completed in the first half of the 20th century that relied heavily on civil-engineering expertise. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Tim Pearce (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: San antonio texas river walk 2011 riverwalk Era_date_from: 1929
Lake Washington Ship Canal & Hiram M. Chittenden Locks
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Transportation Era: 1910-1919 DateCreated: 1917 Hiram M. Chittenden Locks and Carl S. English Jr. Botanical Garden Zanesville State: WA Zip: 98107 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/lake-washington-ship-canal---hiram-m-chittenden-locks/ Creator: Chittenden, Hiram

After more than 50 years of contention and debate, dredging began in 1911 on an eight-mile channel connecting Puget Sound, Seattle's gateway to the Pacific, to two inland freshwater lakes, Lake Washington and Lake Union. With the completion of the Lake Washington ship channel and Chittenden locks, coal and logs from the interior had a dedicated water route to the ocean, and the city's 4 1/2 miles of coastal harbor burgeoned into 100 miles of commercial, industrial and recreational piers and wharves.  

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/gb_packards (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Lake Washington ship channel and Chittenden locks allowed for the transport of coal and logs and revitalized the coastal harbor. Era_date_from: 1917
Joining of the Rails - Transcontinental Railroad
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1860-1869 DateCreated: 1869 Golden Spike Rd Promontory State: UT Zip: 84307 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/joining-of-the-rails--transcontinental-rr/ Creator: Union Pacific Railroad, Central Pacific Railroad

"May God continue the unity of our Country as this Railroad unites the two great Oceans of the world."  
- Inscription on the ceremonial Golden Spike 

The symbolic Golden Spike, staked in Promontory, Utah in 1869, marked the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, joining the Union Pacific Railroad from the East and the Central Pacific Railroad from the west. 

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy of the National Park Service Image Caption: A crowd of 1,500 assembled in Promontory for the ceremony to join the rails and, symbolically, the nation. Era_date_from: 1869
Ironbridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1750-1799 DateCreated: 1779 Coalbrookdale-Ironbridge State: Zip: TF8 7AL Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/project/iron-bridge/ Creator: Darby III, Abraham

This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. This rural region of England was an important industrial area thanks to coal deposits near the surface. In 1776 the nearest bridge that enabled people and goods to pass over the River Severn was two miles away at Buildwas. There was a ferry crossing, but the trip was difficult and dangerous especially in winter. In 1776, an Act to build a bridge to remedy this situation received Royal Assent.

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Jasonjsmith Image Caption: This bridge is recognized as the first iron bridge in the world. Era_date_from: 1779
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Innovations

Cape Cod Canal

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Cortland Street Drawbridge

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