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Civil

White Pass & Yukon Railroad
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Roads & Rails Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1900 Whitehorse State: Yukon Zip: Country: Canada Website: http://www.asce.org/project/white-pass-and-yukon-railroad/ Creator: Brackett, George

Combining British financing, American engineering, and Canadian contracting, the White Pass and Yukon was the first major civil engineering project on the continent above the 60th degree of northern latitude. Completed in 27 months using only hand tools, black powder, and regional timber, the White Pass and Yukon rises almost 2,900 feet from sea level at the port of Skagway to the White Pass summit on the U.S.-Canada border in just 20 miles, accomplishing one of the steepest climbs of any railroad in the world.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Klanda (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: White Pass & Yukon Railroad Era_date_from: 1900
Whipple Truss Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1855 Schenectady State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Whipple-Truss-Bridge/ Creator: Whipple, Squire

The Whipple Bowstring Truss Bridge was built from a design patented in 1841 by Squire Whipple. Whipple was the first person to understand the stresses in truss members and he developed the first theoretical formula to calculate stresses in the articulated truss. His bowstring truss was the first to use cast iron for compression and wrought iron for tension membranes.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Rehrenberg Image Caption: A Whipple Bowstring Arch/Truss style bridge, built by S. DeGraff in Albany, NY Era_date_from: 1855
West Baden Springs Hotel
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1901 West Baden Springs Orange County State: IN Zip: 47469 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/West-Baden-Springs-Hotel/ Creator: Albright, Harrison , Westcott, Oliver

The steel dome stretches 200 feet in diameter and rises 100 feet at its top. To accommodate thermal expansion, the inverted bowl-shaped structure originally rested on rollers that sat on the flat tops of six-story columns

There was a time when Americans from the Eastern seaboard braved long rail trips to southern Indiana in hopes that the water at the French Lick natural mineral springs could bring relief from alcoholism, pimples, gallstones and a host of other ailments and illnesses.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bulldog23 (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: West Baden Springs Hotel Era_date_from: 1901
Watertown Arsenal
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Civil Engineering Profession Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1859 Talcott Avenue Watertown State: MA Zip: 02472 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Watertown-Arsenal/ Creator: Parris, Alexander

The Watertown Arsenal was the first major engineering testing laboratory in America. It was created to store and manufacture cutting-edge military technology and weaponry. The United States Army Research and Materials Laboratory continued to use the site until 1989, employing soldiers and civilians to produce and test artillery.

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: public domain Image Caption: Watertown Arsenal Era_date_from: 1859
Washington Monument
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1880-1889 DateCreated: 1885 101-199 15th St SW
Washington State: DC Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Washington-Monument/ Creator: Casey, Thomas Lincoln

Upon its dedication in 1885, the Washington Monument was the tallest structure in the world. Begun in 1848 to honor George Washington, the structure wasn't completed for over 36 years. Construction and financing problems slowed progress and the Civil War halted it completely.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sebastien Fuss (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Washington Monument Era_date_from: 1885
Ward House
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Buildings Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 1-99 Magnolia Dr
Brook
Rye State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Ward-House/ Creator: Ward, William , Mook, Robert

It is a large, imposing structure (over a dozen rooms and spacious halls) dominated by a four-story octagonal tower at one corner and a second shorter square tower at another corner containing tanks for potable and fire-fighting water supply.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Daniel Case (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Ward House Era_date_from: 1876
Walnut Street Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1890-1899 DateCreated: 1890 Susquehanna River Harrisburd State: PA Zip: 17101 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Walnut-Street-Bridge/ Creator: Bollman, Wendel , Reeves, Samuel

The structure has two segments: an East Channel bridge consisting of four 175-foot spans and three 240-foot spans crossing from Harrisburg to City Island; and a West Channel bridge, consisting of seven 175-foot spans crossing from City Island to Wormleysburg.

With 15 truss spans totaling 2,820 feet, the Walnut Street Bridge is the finest and largest surviving example of the standardized Phoenix wrought-iron truss bridges produced from 1884 to 1923.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/rjonesProject856 (cc-by-2.0) Image Caption: Walnut Street Bridge Era_date_from: 1890
Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1931 Penobscot River Stockton Springs State: ME Zip: E 04981 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1931
Vulcan Street Plant
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Power Generation Era: 1880-1889 DateCreated: 1882 Fox River Appleton State: WI Zip: 54911 Country: USA Website: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/29-vulcan-street-power-plant, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/c0b5b641-34df-46a5-aa22-c847b42084b4/29-Vulcan-Street-Power-Plant.aspx Creator: Rogers, H.J. , Edison, Thomas

The plant began operation only twenty-six days after Thomas Edison's first steam plant began operating on Pearl Street in New York (NL 46). On September 30, 1882, an Edison "K" type dynamo produced electricity from a water-powered turbine to light three buildings (two paper mills and the H.J. Rogers home), at rate of about 12 1/2 kilowatts. It is the first Edison hydroelectric central station to serve a system of private and commercial customers in North America. The story of its development provides keen insight into the nation's first experiences with the electric light.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bigcityal (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Vulcan Street Plant Era_date_from: 1882
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1905 State: Zip: Country: Zimbabwe Website: Creator: Rhodes, Cecil
The Victoria Falls Bridge, completed in 1905, is a 152-meter span, steel-lattice, two-hinged arch bridge with a deck level 122 m above the Zambezi River. Conceived by Cecil Rhodes as a key link in his proposed Cape-to-Cairo railway, it is situated just downstream of the Victoria Falls in a site of unsurpassed grandeur. Although a product of the colonial period, it continues to serve and enhance the lives of all people living in the region.
YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Christopher Jensen (CC BY-ND 2.0) Image Caption: Victoria Falls Bridge Era_date_from: 1905
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Innovations

Marshall Building

Designed by Claude A. P. Turner, a pioneer of reinforced concrete construction, the Marshall Building was constructed originally in 1906 as a five-story building. In 1911 the sixth floor of the building was added as per Turner's original design. This building is the oldest extant example of…

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Mason-Dixon Line

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Rogue River Bridge

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Minot's Ledge Lighthouse

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Moffat Tunnel

Known as "the highest and lowest holing in history," the tunnel bored through the Rockies at an elevation of 9,200 feet, 2,800 feet below the surface. Eight hundred men worked around the clock for 3 1/2 years, moving 3 billion pounds of rock. 

Three thousand feet under the Continental…

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Morison's Memphis Bridge

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The Tabernacle in December 2008

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Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge

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Mullan Road

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The Navajo Bridge (also known as the Grand Canyon Bridge) was built in 1929 by the Arizona Highway Department and…

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Northern Pacific High Line Bridge No 64

The Northern Pacific High Line Bridge No. 64, built between 1907 and 1908, has continued to perform yeoman service in the uninterrupted flow of the Nation's commerce. Nearly, 100 years after this bridge officially opened, it still carries 125-ton car unit coal trains, double stack container…

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Northampton Street Bridge

The crossing of the Delaware River at Easton, Pennsylvania, provided a central link in travel from the northeastern seaboard to America's inland territories throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries. From 1806 to the mid-1890s, travelers used a landmark wooden structure built by noted bridge-…

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Panama Canal

The United States became interested in a water route through the Panamanian isthmus in the mid-1850s, but it was the French who first attempted to build the Panama Canal. Led by Ferdinand de Lesseps, builder of the Suez Canal in Egypt, the French began the project in 1876. Conditions were brutal…

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