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Civil

Five Stone Arch Bridges
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1830-1839 DateCreated: 1830-1860 Hillsborough State: NH Zip: 03244 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Five-Stone-Arch-Bridges/ Creator:

"Some of New Hampshire's most aesthetically pleasing yet least appreciated structures are stone arch bridges."

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Glass_house (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: The Gleason Falls Bridges, built in 1830, stands as a testament to the durability of dry-laid stone arches. Era_date_from: 1830
Firth of Forth Railway Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1890-1899 DateCreated: 1890 Queensferry State: Zip: EH30 9SF Country: UK Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Firth-of-Forth-Railway-Bridge/ Creator: Benjamin, Baker

"The majestic Forth Bridge ... symbolises the tremendous achievements of Victorian engineers and the immense strides made in the technique of bridge design and construction since the dawn of the Railway Age..."
 - Derrick Bennett, Bridges: Great Buildings of the World

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Brain M Forbes (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: The Forth Bridge became the longest bridge in the world when it was completed in 1890. Era_date_from: 1890
First New York Subway
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Roads & Rails Era: 1900-1909 DateCreated: 1900-1904 New York State: NY Zip: 10007 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/First-New-York-Subway/ Creator: Interborough Rapid Transit Company

In the 19th century, New York City was a burgeoning industrial and commercial metropolis - the largest city in the United States and second largest in the world. As the city's population increased, people began to call for construction of an underground railway. Many unusual engineering challenges had to be overcome, not the least of which was construction in a dense urban area. After lengthy legal battles over property rights and the debt limit of the city, ground was broken on March 24, 1900.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Interborough Rapid Transit Company Image Caption: A map of New York's first underground subway. Era_date_from: 1900
Fink Through Truss Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1858 Hamden State: NJ Zip: 08801 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fink-Through-Truss-Bridge/ Creator:

"Fink's truss design was one of a number of early patented solutions to [the problem of how] to carry a massive, moving weight (a train) over long spans (to avoid the expense of building piers and obstructing waterways) on easily erected bridges (often in rough terrain) with good long-term economy..." 
 - Kent Farnow Smith, "America's Oldest Functioning Iron-Truss Bridge," 1978

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Library of Congress Image Caption: This bridge is an example of the Fink truss, the most efficient solution to building long-span bridges quickly and economically during its time. Era_date_from: 1858
Embudo, New Mexico Stream Gauging Station
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Supply & Control Era: 1880-1889 DateCreated: 1888 Embudo State: NM Zip: 87531 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/embudo,-new-mexico-stream-guaging-station/ Creator: Powell, John Wesley

A tiny village on the Rio Grande River in northern New Mexico became the training center for the first American hydrographers and provided the first stream-gauging operations of the U.S. Geological Survey. To plan any water system, it is necessary to know the amount of water flowing in the stream or river at all times - including low, normal, and flood conditions. 

YearAdded:
1973
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Chris English (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Near Velarde, NM: U.S. Geological Survey Rio Grande Embudo Gaging Station, 2011 Era_date_from: 1888
El Camino Real - The Royal Road
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Roads & Rails Era: 1000-1599 DateCreated: 1519 Mexico City to Santa Fe State: NM Zip: 87501 Country: USA Website: https://www.asce.org/project/el-camino-real---the-royal-road/ Creator: Spain, Kingdom of

El Camino Real (literally, "the royal road") is the oldest and longest historical trail in the Western Hemisphere. The transportation link has, through the centuries, been called various names, including El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (literally, "the road to the interior" because the U.S. frontier was seen as the country interior to Mexico), the King's Highway and the Royal Highway. It became a transportation lifeline that helped integrate Spanish and European culture in the Southwestern U.S. 

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/National Park Service Image Caption: El Camino Real (literally, "the royal road") is the oldest and longest historical trail in the Western Hemisphere. Era_date_from: 1519
East Maui Irrigation System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876-1923 East Maui State: HI Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/East-Maui-Irrigation-System/ Creator: Henry Perrine Baldwin

The East Maui Irrigation System is Hawaii's most dramatic water story. It began with the construction of the Old Hamakua Ditch built between 1876 and 1878. This privately financed, constructed and managed irrigation system was one of the largest in the United States. It eventually included 50 miles of tunnels; 24 miles of open ditches, inverted siphons and flumes; incorporates approximately 400 intakes and 8 reservoirs.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Will Scullin (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: East Maui Irrigation Ditch Era_date_from: 1876
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Supply & Control Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1875-1879 New Orleans State: LA Zip: 70113 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Eads-South-Pass-Navigation-Works/ Creator: Eads, James Buchanan

"Eads had to succeed in the face of conventional wisdom which doomed him to disaster. Entrenched authorities not only completely dismissed his theories, but pointed to the indifferent European experiences with what he proposed."  
 - ASCE Landmark Nomination Proposal, 1982   

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Image Caption: Era_date_from: 1875
Dublin-Belfast Rail Link
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1842-1855 Dublin to Belfast State: Zip: Country: Ireland Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Dublin-Belfast-Rail-Link/ Creator:

The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The line's most notable engineering feature was the 1,760-foot-long Boyne Bridge; it represented one of the earliest uses of calculated stresses, the first large-scale use of wrought iron latticed girders, and the first full scale test of continuous beams. Tests performed on the wrought iron columns and struts were published and provided invaluable information for engineers who would design similar structures in the future. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Henry Clark Image Caption: The Dublin to Belfast Rail Link established a vital connection between the capitals of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Era_date_from: 1842
City Plan of Philadelphia
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Structures Era: 1600s DateCreated: 1682 Philadelphia State: PA Zip: undefined Country: USA Website: https://www.asce.org/project/city-plan-of-philadelphia/ Creator:

The City Plan of Philadelphia is a seminal creation in American city planning in that it was the first American City Plan to provide open public squares for the free enjoyment of the community and a gridiron street pattern featuring streets of varying widths: wide main streets and narrower side streets. In addition this plan was the first city plan in the United States to provide for long-term urban growth. These features inspired the planners of many cities to adopt the Philadelphia Plan as a model. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Dogears Image Caption: The City Plan of Philadelphia pioneered many features of American city planning. Era_date_from: 1682
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Innovations

Modified Fink trussed Girder bridge

The Fink Deck Truss Bridge is thought to have been originally used on the Norfolk and Western mainline railway. It was moved to its present location and converted to a vehicular bridge over a railroad spur in 1893 when the Norfolk and Western mainline was moved. It was relocated again in 1985 to…

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Folsom Hydroelectric Power System

"The State [of California] agreed to construct the dam using convict labor for which consideration the State received a grant of land for the construction of a prison and water power rights from the impounded water ...; The work progressed slowly during the dry season by disinterested convict…

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Fort Peck Dam

The Fort Peck Dam was a cornerstone project of the Works Progress Administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. It required the largest construction plant and workforce since the construction of the Panama Canal and peaked at 11,000 workers. It was the largest dam of any type in the world…

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Frankford Avenue Bridge

"For 273 years, the little stone bridge that carries Frankford Ave. across Pennypack Creek has been doing its humble job with a minimum of attention..." 
 - Gerald McKelvey, The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 16, 1970

Built more than a century before the reign of Napoleon,…

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Fresno Scraper

The Fresno scraper established the basis for the modern earthmoving scraper, being able to scrape and move a load of soil, then discharge it at a controlled depth. It quadrupled the productivity of manual labor, replacing hand shoveling of earth into horse carts.

James Porteous, a…

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Fritz Engineering Laboratory

In 1907, John Fritz, known as the "Father of the Steel Industry in the United States," rejoined the Lehigh University Board of Trustees after an absence of a decade. He began the development of what would prove to be his greatest gift to Lehigh: a modern engineering laboratory and funding for…

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Galveston Seawall and Grade Raising

Galveston Island is a barrier island located two miles off the Texas coast. The island is about 3 miles wide at its widest and about 28 miles long. The Galveston Seawall extends over 10 miles along Galveston's oceanfront, protecting life and property against hurricanes and tropical storms. …

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Going-to-the-Sun Road

Considered one of the world's most scenic mountain drives, the two-lane Going-To-The-Sun Road through Glacier National Park was the first major road to be constructed directly over high mountain terrain, proving that roads did not need to be limited to mountain passes.

Glacier National…

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Golden Gate Bridge

Put in service in 1937, this world-renowned bridge, conceived by Joseph Strauss and designed largely by Charles Ellis, was the longest single span (4,200 feet) in the world for a quarter century.

As with many civil engineering projects in their conceptual stages, naysayers scoffed at the…

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Goldfields Water Supply

Originally known as the Coolgardie Goldfields Water Supply Scheme, the Goldfields Water Supply, Western Australia, has exceptional and unique cultural significance for Australia.  Western Australia's first Premier, the dynamic and visionary Sir John Forrest, recognized the need for this…

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Baldwin's dry dock in Virginia has been designated a National Historical Landmark and is still in use at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. The Charlestown dry dock and original pump house, while no longer used, are on display as part of the Boston National Historical Park. Although the need for dry-… Read More
Gota Canal

The Gota Canal is the biggest infrastructure project ever built in Sweden. The canal was dug by hand with shovels made of wood. It took over 22 years of 12-hour days - an estimated 12 million man-days of labor - to complete the project.  

The Gota (pronounced yeu-ta) Canal is a 347-…

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Grand Coulee Dam

The massive Grand Coulee Dam, on the Columbia River, is the largest concrete structure in the U.S., the largest hydroelectric facility in the U.S., and the sixth-largest hydroelectric facility in the world. It provides irrigation for up to 1.1 million acres of agricultural lands and the…

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Guayabo Ceremonial Center

The early people of Costa Rica in the present-day area of Turrialba in Cartago Province built this ceremonial center with care and precision, and it is the country's primary and most important archaeological site. The Guayabo National Monument is of international significance because of its…

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Gunnison Tunnel

At its completion, the 5.8-mile Gunnison Tunnel under western Colorado's Vernal Mesa was the longest irrigation tunnel in America. It carried water from the Gunnison River to the Uncompahgre Valley to irrigate 146,000 acres of cropland. 

Work on the 30,582-foot tunnel was first performed…

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Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower was built for the International Exhibition of Paris of 1889 commemorating the centenary of the French Revolution. Of the 700 proposals submitted in a design competition, Gustave Eiffel's was unanimously chosen. At 300 meters and 7,000 tons, it was the world's tallest…

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Hagia Sophia

The church of Hagia Sophia (literally "Holy Wisdom") in Constantinople, now Istanbul, was first dedicated in 360 by Emperor Constantius, son of the city's founder, Emperor Constantine. Hagia Sophia served as the cathedra, or bishop's seat, of the city. Originally called Megale Ekklesia (Great…

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Hanford B Reactor

In the first nine months of operation, the B reactor produced fissionable plutonium for the world's first atomic bomb (the Trinity test on July 16, 1945), and for the atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, killing 35,000 people.  This, and similar destruction at…

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This landmark artifact represents the first commercially successful farm tractor in the world powered by an internal-combustion engine. It was invented and built by Charles W. Hart and Charles H. Parr in Charles City, Iowa, as their Model 3, following two prototype versions. Major accomplishments… Read More
Cranetown Triangulation Site

The precise system of measurements provided today by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey originated with an act of Congress under the administration of Thomas Jefferson in 1807 that funded work on "an accurate chart" of America's coastal waters. Intended to aid sea-going commerce, the first…

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