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1950-1959

RL-10 Rocket Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-36-rl-10-rocket-engine-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/e04882e6-5b54-404f-b634-f7e4d4494067/36-RL-10-Rocket-Engine.aspxCreator: Pratt & Whitney

The RL-10, which served as the power plant for NASA's upper-stage Centaur space launch vehicle, was the first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as a fuel. It has provided precisely controlled, reliable power for lunar and planetary explorations. The RL-10 embodied numerous advanced design features, including multiple use of its fuel with the "bootstrap cycle." The RL-10 is also capable of multiple restarts in space, which enables positioning of satellites or further escape of Earth's gravity.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as fuel.Era_date_from: 1958
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1955Arnold Air Force BaseArnold AFBState: TNZip: 37389Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-140-arnold-afb-wind-tunnel-%281955%29Creator: Sverdrup, Lief
This propulsion wind tunnel (PWT) at Arnold AFB was the first large-scale facility for testing jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditions. It has a unique combination of transonic (1955) and supersonic (1960) wind tunnels using a common 236,000 horsepower drive, the world's largest when built. It can achieve air speeds up to Mach 4.75 at altitudes up to 150,000 feet in its 16-foot square, removable test sections. Design engineers were Lief J. Sverdrup, John R. Parcel, Brice Smith, and Walter Cook, of Sverdrup and Parcel, St.
YearAdded:
1989
Image Credit: Public Domain (US Air Force)Image Caption: The world's first large-scale testing facility for jet and rocket engines in simulated high-speed flight conditionsEra_date_from: 1955
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Steven F. Udvar-Hazy CenterChantillyState: VAZip: 20151Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-178-boeing-367-80-%281954%29-, http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/Communities/History/Landmarks/5506.pdfCreator: Boeing
The 367-80 is the prototype for most jet transports. Its success was due largely to its mechanical systems, including turbine engines with thrust reversers and noise suppressors, redundant hydraulic control systems, and an improved cabin-pressurization system. Honeycomb flap panels were introduced, along with a strong, lightweight structural design that controlled fatigue cracking. These led to several innovations in aircraft tooling and manufacturing techniques. The Dash-80 was the first commercial airliner economical enough to take the US airline industry off subsidy.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Boeing Dreamscape (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Prototype of the Boeing 707 and most jet transport systems, the Boeing 367-80 established economic feasibility of commercial air travel.Era_date_from: 1954
USS Albacore
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953 Submarine Memorial AssociationPortsmouthState: NHCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-209-uss-albacore-%281953%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/04c57e57-f78e-461b-84c1-858a60d0be89/209-USS-Albacore-1953.aspxCreator: David Taylor Model Basin, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

The USS Albacore (AGSS-569) represented a radical change in submarine design. The hull was designed with underwater speed as the prime requirement, and it was built with newly developed high-strength steel (HY-80). In addition to these two major innovations, the Albacore served as a test vessel for many new designs in submarine technology so that they could be refined before implementing them into the fleet. Among them was the testing of various control designs and correlation of actual sea-trial performance with that predicted in tow-tank tests.  

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: USS AlbacoreEra_date_from: 1953
SS Badger Carferry
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1952Lake MichiganLudingtonState: MIZip: 49431Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-191-ss-badger-carferry-%281952%29Creator: Christy Corporation, Skinner Engine Company

The two 3,500-hp steeple compound Unaflow steam engines powering the S.S. Badger represent one of the last types of reciprocating marine steam engines. Built by the Skinner Engine Company, most Unaflow engines are single expansion. These feature tandem high- and low-pressure cylinders separated by a common head. The Badger's four Foster-Wheeler Type D marine boilers, which supply 470-psig steam to the engines, are among the last coal-fired marine boilers built. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/ssbadger (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: SS Badger CarferryEra_date_from: 1952
Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954University of Florida
GainesvilleState: FLCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-223-solar-energy-and-energy-conversion-laboratory, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/6ab985e7-a7b5-4c91-b4d7-8c32af04334c/223-Solar-Energy-and-Energy-Conversion-Laboratory.aspxCreator: Farber, Erich

This highly diverse facility has pioneered the development of solar energy applications worldwide. The Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory (SEECL) was unique in developing practical solar energy devices based on established principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics long before solar energy was considered a serious energy alternative.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: The SEECL was originally located at the Gianesville Regional Airport. Early experimental devices stood on the pad near the WW II bunker (early 1950s).Era_date_from: 1954
Shippingport Nuclear Power Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: NuclearEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Duquesne Light Company
ShippingportState: PAZip: 15050Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-nuclear/-47-shippingport-nuclear-power-station-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/c64a220f-030c-4384-8336-7d9857248322/47-Shippingport-Nuclear-Power-Station.aspxCreator: Duquesne Light Company

The first commercial central electric-generating station in the United States to use nuclear energy was the Shippingport Atomic Power Station of the Department of Energy and the Duquesne Light Company. In a dramatic high-tech display, ground was broken in 1954 during dedication ceremonies by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who also opened it on May 26, 1958, as part of his "Atoms for Peace" program. Shippingport is located on the Ohio River about 25 miles from Pittsburgh.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Shippingport Nuclear Power StationEra_date_from: 1958
NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1956NASA Ames Research CenterMoffett FieldState: CAZip: 94035Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-187-nasa-ames-unitary-plan-wind-tunnel-%281956%29

This wind tunnel complex was developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NASA's predecessor) to serve the emerging need for supersonic research and development following World War II. The three-testing-section configuration covers Mach number .03-3.5 and utilizes a single common drive and two compressors.

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind TunnelEra_date_from: 1956
Mackinac Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Mackinac BridgeSt IgnaceState: MIZip: 49781Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Mackinac-Bridge/Creator: Steinman, David

The Mackinac (pronounced "Mack-in-awe") Bridge (1957) spans the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, connecting the Lower and Upper peninsulas of Michigan.   Prior to the construction of the bridge, a fleet of nine ferries would carry as many as 9,000 vehicles per day, with traffic backups stretching as long as 16 miles.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Miss a Liss (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Mackinac BridgeEra_date_from: 1958
Society: SPIEMain Category: OpticsSub Category: Lasers & ElectroopticsEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1957600-700 Mountain AvenueMurray HillState: NJZip: 07974Country: USAWebsite: http://spie.org/Creator: Gould, Gordon , Bell Labs
As ideas developed, they abandoned infrared radiation to instead concentrate upon visible light. The concept originally was called an "optical maser". In 1958, Bell Labs filed a patent application for their proposed optical maser; and Schawlow and Townes submitted a manuscript of their theoretical calculations to the Physical Review, published that year in Volume 112, Issue No. 6. Simultaneously, at Columbia University, graduate student Gordon Gould was working on a doctoral thesis about the energy levels of excited thallium.
Image Credit: Courtesy of the US Air ForceImage Caption: A scientist tests a laser at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory.Era_date_from: 1957
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