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1900-1909

First New York Subway
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900-1904New YorkState: NYZip: 10007Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/First-New-York-Subway/Creator: Interborough Rapid Transit Company

In the 19th century, New York City was a burgeoning industrial and commercial metropolis - the largest city in the United States and second largest in the world. As the city's population increased, people began to call for construction of an underground railway. Many unusual engineering challenges had to be overcome, not the least of which was construction in a dense urban area. After lengthy legal battles over property rights and the debt limit of the city, ground was broken on March 24, 1900.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Interborough Rapid Transit Company Image Caption: A map of New York's first underground subway.Era_date_from: 1900
Wright Flyer III
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1905 Aviation Heritage Natl Hist ParkDaytonState: OHZip: 45409Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/224-wright-flyer-iii, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/3764d124-ce32-4335-bbac-24836c780066/224-Wright-Flyer-III.aspxCreator: Wright, Wilbur, Wright, Orville

The 1905 Wright Flyer III, built by Wilbur (1867-1912) and Orville (1871-1948) Wright, was the world's first airplane capable of sustained, maneuverable flight. Similar in design to their celebrated first airplane, this machine featured a stronger structure, a larger engine turning new "bent-end" propellers, and greater control-surface area for improved safety and maneuverability.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expr.)Image Caption: Wright Flyer IIIEra_date_from: 1905
Williamsburg Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Williamsburg BridgeBrooklynState: NYZip: 11211Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Williamsburg-Bridge/Creator: Buck, Leffert , Lindenthal, Gustav

When opened in 1903, the 1,600 foot long main span of the Williamsburg Bridge was the world's longest suspension span, surpassing the nearby Brooklyn Bridge by only 4.5 feet. The Williamsburg Bridge remained the world's longest suspension bridge span for 21 years until the opening of the Bear Mountain Bridge in 1924. The Williamsburg Bridge has two unsuspended side spans of 596.5 feet, each supported from below by trussed towers, giving the bridge an overall length of 2,793 feet. The four main suspension cables are 18.75 inches in diameter and each composed of over 10,000 wires.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Kev Gilmour (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Williamsburg BridgeEra_date_from: 1903
White Pass & Yukon Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900WhitehorseState: YukonCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/white-pass-and-yukon-railroad/Creator: Brackett, George

Combining British financing, American engineering, and Canadian contracting, the White Pass and Yukon was the first major civil engineering project on the continent above the 60th degree of northern latitude. Completed in 27 months using only hand tools, black powder, and regional timber, the White Pass and Yukon rises almost 2,900 feet from sea level at the port of Skagway to the White Pass summit on the U.S.-Canada border in just 20 miles, accomplishing one of the steepest climbs of any railroad in the world.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Klanda (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: White Pass & Yukon RailroadEra_date_from: 1900
West Baden Springs Hotel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1901West Baden SpringsOrange CountyState: INZip: 47469Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/West-Baden-Springs-Hotel/Creator: Albright, Harrison , Westcott, Oliver

The steel dome stretches 200 feet in diameter and rises 100 feet at its top. To accommodate thermal expansion, the inverted bowl-shaped structure originally rested on rollers that sat on the flat tops of six-story columns

There was a time when Americans from the Eastern seaboard braved long rail trips to southern Indiana in hopes that the water at the French Lick natural mineral springs could bring relief from alcoholism, pimples, gallstones and a host of other ailments and illnesses.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bulldog23 (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: West Baden Springs HotelEra_date_from: 1901
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1905Country: ZimbabweCreator: Rhodes, Cecil
The Victoria Falls Bridge, completed in 1905, is a 152-meter span, steel-lattice, two-hinged arch bridge with a deck level 122 m above the Zambezi River. Conceived by Cecil Rhodes as a key link in his proposed Cape-to-Cairo railway, it is situated just downstream of the Victoria Falls in a site of unsurpassed grandeur. Although a product of the colonial period, it continues to serve and enhance the lives of all people living in the region.
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Christopher Jensen (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Victoria Falls BridgeEra_date_from: 1905
Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric Complex
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Salmon Run WaySault Ste. MarieState: MIZip: 49783Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/sault-ste--marie-hydroelectric-power-complex/Creator: Modjeski, Ralph , Noble, Alfred

Located at the northern tip of Michigan where Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron join together, the Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric Power Complex was built to harness the hydroelectric potential of the  20-foot falls at the headwaters of the St. Marys (sic) River, the sole outlet of Lake Superior. A century after its construction, the  plant remains the largest low-head hydroelectric facility in the United States. Today, the Sault Ste. Marie plant supplies electricity to area residents, especially those in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Madison Berndt (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Sault Ste. Marie Hydroelectric ComplexEra_date_from: 1902
Rockville Stone Arch Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Susquehanna RiverMarysvilleState: PAZip: 17053Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Rockville-Stone-Arch-Bridge/

The third bridge built on the same site to carry railroad tracks across the Susquehanna River just north of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the Rockville Stone Arch Bridge, at 3,820 feet long and 52 feet wide, is believed to be the longest and widest stone-arch railroad bridge in the world. A central link in rail travel between New York City and Pittsburgh, the Rockville Stone Arch Bridge accommodates four lines of railroad tracks, today serving both the Norfolk Southern and Amtrak lines.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/John Mueller (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Rockville Stone Arch BridgeEra_date_from: 1902
Reynolds-Corliss Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1917Main Street Pumping StationJacksonvilleState: FLZip: 32206Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-12-reynolds-corliss-pumping-engine-%281917%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/15c2d049-d9f4-4272-b2b1-620835320534/12_Reynolds_Corliss_Pumping_Engine.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

Installed alongside an Epping Carpenter pump that was later scrapped, this water pump was built by Allis-Chalmers, which for many years had Edwin Reynolds as its chief engineer. Driven by a Corliss steam engine, these large city water pumps were installed in Jacksonville's water supply improvement program in 1915, and each pumped 5 million gallons of water a day until 1930 when the first of the electric-driven peripheral pumping stations began operating. Steam engine operation was discontinued in 1956.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Main Street Pumping Station - Jacksonville Water Department - 1917
Old Plant in Foreground - Landmark Reynolds-corliss Engine and
Allis Chalmers Pump Located in the Building in the Background.
View Looking North From Hogan's Creek
Era_date_from: 1917
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: CommunicationsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1904General Electic CompanySchenectadyState: NYZip: 12306Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Alexanderson_Radio_Alternator,_1904Creator: Alexanderson, Ernst
"The Alexanderson radio alternator was a high-power, radio-frequency source which provided reliable transoceanic radiotelegraph communication during and after World War I. Ernst F.W. Alexanderson (1878-1975), a General Electric engineer, designed radio alternators with a frequency range to 100 kHz and a power capability from 2 kW to 200 kW.
YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Alexanderson Radio AlternatorEra_date_from: 1904
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